Event Fatigue

davidhuyck:

Graham Annable is great at the ghoulies! His feature-film directorial debut was a ton of fun - go see Boxtrolls!

mattfractionblog:

THIS
IS
HAPPENING
weds. - 7:30 - powell’s city of books

mattfractionblog:

THIS

IS

HAPPENING

weds. - 7:30 - powell’s city of books

mattfractionblog:

sixpenceee:

Navajo man dressed up as nayenezgani spirit. The nayenezgani spirit is a “slayer of alien gods.” The Navajo believe that this spirit casts out the evil spirits of the world. (More Information)

THE SLAYER OF ALIEN GODS

mattfractionblog:

sixpenceee:

Navajo man dressed up as nayenezgani spirit. The nayenezgani spirit is a “slayer of alien gods.” The Navajo believe that this spirit casts out the evil spirits of the world. (More Information)

THE SLAYER OF ALIEN GODS

holybatblogbatman:


The only time I ever feel pride is when I look at Nightwing. Sometimes I think he is the only thing I ever did right. (JLA #73)

I never run out of ways to say that Bruce and Dick have a special bond, one that neither ever managed to have with anyone else. No matter how much he loves the other boys, Bruce looks at Jason and sees a boy he destroyed by making him Robin, looks at Tim and sees someone he was never able to be there for enough, looks at Damian and sees a child he failed by not even knowing he existed. But when he looks at Dick he sees a boy who grew into a man that is kind, smart and strong. A man with friends and allies and family. A hero with unshakable morale fiber. Yes they fought, and yes things weren’t always easy, Dick got hurt and attacked. But even Bruce knows that a good portion of who Dick is today is because of his foster-father.

No shut up, YOU’RE crying…

holybatblogbatman:

The only time I ever feel pride is when I look at Nightwing. Sometimes I think he is the only thing I ever did right. (JLA #73)

I never run out of ways to say that Bruce and Dick have a special bond, one that neither ever managed to have with anyone else. No matter how much he loves the other boys, Bruce looks at Jason and sees a boy he destroyed by making him Robin, looks at Tim and sees someone he was never able to be there for enough, looks at Damian and sees a child he failed by not even knowing he existed. But when he looks at Dick he sees a boy who grew into a man that is kind, smart and strong. A man with friends and allies and family. A hero with unshakable morale fiber. Yes they fought, and yes things weren’t always easy, Dick got hurt and attacked. But even Bruce knows that a good portion of who Dick is today is because of his foster-father.

No shut up, YOU’RE crying…

latenightseth:

Red Sox fan Stephen King will let bygones be bygones when it comes to Derek Jeter. 

latenightseth:

Red Sox fan Stephen King will let bygones be bygones when it comes to Derek Jeter. 

brianmichaelbendis:

The great legacy of the logo teaser ad

You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

rufftoon:

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

image

start to put on features

image

fix stuff

image

put on more stuff

image

fix stuff again

image

erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

image

2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

image

image

image

That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

All great tips, plus bonus Zhao.

<3

twentypercentcooler:

vgjunk:

Some character profiles from Saturday Night Slam Masters, arcade. I’m surprised that Haggar was born in New York and not Metro City. I’m not surprised that he likes pounding punks.

LIFE GOALS

Favorite Attack: DREAD LOCK
ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]
By Chris Sims
To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.
Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.
READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

I like Greg Rucka more and more every time I read/hear an interview with him.

ruckawriter:

comicsalliance:

BORN IN A WORLD OF TRAGEDY: GREG RUCKA REFLECTS ON HIS BATMAN WORK, PART ONE [INTERVIEW]

By Chris Sims

To say that Greg Rucka had a profound impact on DC Comics in the 21st Century is underselling things quite a bit. After arriving on the scene in the late ’90s, he became one of the few writers to have written all three of DC’s biggest characters, with critically acclaimed runs on Action Comics and Wonder Woman. It was on Batman, however, where he made his biggest impact, as one of the writers for the year-long No Man’s Land crossover, the relaunched “New Gotham” era of Detective Comics, and cowriter of the enduringly influential Gotham Central.

Today, we begin an in-depth look back at Rucka’s tenure on the Dark Knight, starting with No Man’s Land, both the comic and its surprisingly popular novelization, in which Gotham City becomes a dark dystopia following a cataclysmic earthquake; his feelings about the core idea of Batman; and his frustrations on seeing the Joker show up in the pages of Superman.

READ MORE

Had a lovely, long, and rambling chat with Chris Sims about my time in the Batman Universe. He’s easy to talk to. I’m not sure I’m that easy to listen to, but there you go….

I like Greg Rucka more and more every time I read/hear an interview with him.

brianmichaelbendis:

All hail the King